28 July 2015

5 More Inspired Ways to Develop Content Ideas


Here is more inspiration as a follow-up to 5 Inspired Ways to Develop Content Ideas. That list had suggestions that you can do in minutes while sitting at your desk. This list of inspiring quotes requires you to get out from behind your desk.
“Libraries store the energy that fuels the imagination. They open up windows to the world and inspire us to explore and achieve, and contribute to improving our quality of life. Libraries change lives for the better.”  - Sidney Sheldon
#1. Swing by your local library and run your hand along a row of books. Enjoy the relaxing atmosphere and poke around for ideas by scanning book titles in the stacks.
“I've found that many of the greatest ideas surface in bars because that's where many people cultivate inspiration.”  - Herb Kelleher
#2. Off you go to your neighbourhood bar... or coffee shop or... . Take a notepad and pen. Listen to what people are talking about. Ask people for their opinion on something about your business or industry. Write down, record the answers, or even live stream them.
"No two minds ever come together without thereby creating a third, invisible intangible force, which may be likened to a third mind [the master mind]."  - Napoleon Hill
#3. Make a brainstorming date with a colleague. I guarantee that, if you spend just one hour a month brainstorming with a like-minded friend, you won't have a shortage of content ideas.
“A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer.” - Bruce Lee
#4. Interview someone special. It could be an expert in your industry, a customer, a supplier, a collaborator or anyone else touched by what you do. The interview itself will make for great content and you will also get lots of ideas for future articles.
“Physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body, it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity.”  - John F. Kennedy
#5. Go for a walk! Get away from your desk and get your heart pumping. Science has shown that repetitive physical activity switches our brains into a different mode and we're more likely to have ah-ha moments.

20 July 2015

Slice Words to Save Money


If you're beating around the bush, you're wasting time and possibly money. Neil Everton of Podium Media and Communications Coaching suggests we look at our writing with a critical eye and ask: "Am I prepared to pay $1 for every word I've written?"

Unproductive words and phrases abound. I've written before about wimpy phrases to avoid; here are some slightly pretentious ones to also slice out.

“Due to the fact that...”
Use “because” at the beginning, or rearrange the sentence to use it in the middle.

“For the most part...”
Eliminate this one completely without changing your meaning.

“In my opinion...”
Use “I think” or eliminate it all together. I'm already expecting your opinion if I'm reading your writing.

“On a regular basis...”
Save $3 here by using “regularly” or “always” at the end of the sentence instead.

“The first step is to...”
Chop out 4 words and simply use “first”.

Using more words doesn't mean you'll get read more - likely the opposite. Forget those 1000 word essays from high school. Writing great content is about keeping the words that do the work and eliminating the rest. How much money can you save on your next article?


13 July 2015

A Great Newsletter is like a Gift


It’s opened with anticipation.

It’s personal and speaks to your recipient.

It’s about your recipient’s wants and needs, not yours.

It’s appreciated because it brings something of value.

It’s attractively packaged.

It’s delivered directly to your recipient.

photo by HalinaV / Flickr

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08 July 2015

A Blog or a Newsletter

"Which should I start first - a blog or a newsletter?" I swear I've heard this question a hundred times. Not that there's anything wrong with that - it's a great question.

Consider this: "Do you want to just write or do you also want to be read?"

If you want to write to build a resource of information for clients and colleagues, and perhaps to help your SEO, a blog is a great way to do it. But if you want to be read lots, you have to put your writing in front of people on a regular basis.

A blog and a newsletter aren't mutually exclusive. In fact, they make a great team. You can tweet up a storm but, if you really want to build a regular following, you need to deliver it to people.

Being partial to newsletters, I'll tell you to start there first. But then to eventually take your newsletter articles and put them on a blog. And you can always do it the other way around - blog and then send your blog posts out by email. (I do a combination of both.)

Don't let indecision stop you from doing either. Pick one, do it well, and the other will fall into place more naturally.

originally published in Work Better, Not Harder July 8, 2015

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04 July 2015

2 Reasons to Share your Newsletter Archive


Phew, your newsletter is done and sent. But that shouldn't be the last anyone sees of it. With the online version of your newsletter you can have readers anytime - not just when it gets published and not just those it gets emailed to.

#1. Use it as a Resource

If your newsletter is informational and useful beyond today, it can become a valuable resource, sort of like a blog.
  • Occasionally share a link to your archive as a post on your social media platforms.
  • Add it to the Resource page on your website if you have one.
  • Put a link to it in each newsletter issue - "Read past issues."
  • Place a call to action and link to your archive in your email signature.

Some newsletters just aren't as useful as a resource; perhaps you already publish the info on your blog or website, or it is time-sensitive. There's still a good reason to share your newsletter archive.

#2. Use it as an Example

The more clearly someone understands what they are signing up for, the more likely they will be to subscribe. Somewhere near your sign-up form include a link to your archive with a call to action: "Click here to check out our past issues." or "Click here to see what you'll be getting." or "Click here to see what you've been missing."

Get the most out of your newsletter by taking it beyond the emailbox. As a resource and an example, click here to see our newsletter archive.

photo by Aureusbay / Flickr

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29 June 2015

How a Newsletter can make You a Trusted Resource


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23 June 2015

Curate to Become a Trusted Resource

Whatever your specific goals are, your content needs to get read to have any impact and be valuable. It must be useful and interesting to get read. It must get read many times (consistency) to be trusted. You want to be that trusted resource.

I have a trusted resource for social media updates which is a great example of valuable curated content. Do any of us have time to keep up with all of the changes to the social media platforms? Yet we use them every day. I like to know about new functionality and new apps, but I don't have time to keep up. Getting a point form summary of all the changes in my inbox once a month is extremely valuable. It saves me time, I can dig deeper if I want, and I can use the information to make decisions about my social media strategy.

Curating content is a great strategy for providing timely updates about things that change fast. (Tweet This)

social media update section in newsletter
Want to see this great example? Click here to view Twirp Communications’ newsletter archive and open the most recent issue. You'll see there’s a section for social media updates. I love this format because it gives me a snippet of info - enough to decide if I want to know more - and a link to the details.

You don't have to be able to write to provide this kind of valuable information to your target market. But you do need to stay current and have a process to capture the info you gather. I asked Head Twirp Anita Hovey to tell me about her process.
Here's my three-step content curation process for my newsletter:
  1. After an issue goes out, I copy my Word template and rename it to the new month. Every time I hear about a new feature/change to a network, I copy the link and paste into the appropriate section of my template. Sometimes I write a sentence or two right then and link the article. But if I'm in a hurry, I paste the link in and do that later. These changes are usually things I see coming across my Facebook or Twitter feeds, and sometimes they come in emails from my favourite tech sources. 
  2. When my monthly deadline arrives, I go to the corporate blog of each network and scroll through the last month's news to see if there are any changes I've missed. If so, I add them to my template.
  3. I double check to ensure I've summarized all the links in layman's terms before sending for publishing.
If you are an expert, you should be keeping current. And if you're keeping current, gathering the information doesn't have to be a big chore. Anita’s process can be applied to just about any topic - give it a try for yours.

PS: You can sign up for Twirp's newsletter here. It's a great example of a sign-up page!

17 June 2015

Take Time to Take Vacation


Does the thought of taking a vacation feel like work? Now that I'm my own boss, you'd think it'd be easy to take holidays. What I've come to realize is just the opposite.

Lately I've been thinking, “I need a real vacation.” By ‘real’ I mean a vacation where I’m not thinking about work or checking email or wondering if a newsletter got out on time or planning my next blog post. I've discovered there are two things that stop me from taking more vacations.

Money is an obvious reason. When I take vacation, I have to pay someone to work for me. For ‘billable’ work, this can mean that much of the revenue goes to expenses, and there is very little or no income for the vacation period. On top of that, I have to pay someone to do the things I do for ‘free’, such as responding to emails and phone calls. That quickly chews up any remaining revenue. And then there’s the cost of the vacation itself.

Really getting away from work is the other challenge. I received an email yesterday from a client on vacation who needed help to access her email remotely. I’m not the only one who finds it difficult to disconnect.

Here are the reasons why it’s so important that we do take vacations:
  • Relieve stress
  • Improve mental agility - a well-rested mind is often more creative
  • Improve physical health - by catching up on sleep and exercise
  • Spend more time with family
  • Enjoy life - smell the roses, relax on the beach, or lie under pine trees
It might feel like more work to plan a vacation, but our minds and bodies will thank us for the break.

photo by lindadaley / Flickr
originally published in Work Better, Not Harder June 17, 2015

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12 June 2015

3 Wimpy Phrases to Avoid in a Newsletter


These three phrases come up repeatedly in newsletter content - I've edited them out many times. I bet you're familiar with them, too.

“I want to tell you about...”
This is similar to the verbal, “All I'm saying is...” which my husband has adopted lately, or “Here’s the thing...” In an email or newsletter, just go ahead and tell us. If you really want to set the stage for something important, try “I have exciting news...” (But don’t add “... and here it is!”)

“Feel free to contact me...”
Does this mean people aren't usually free to contact you? It sounds like you're giving permission. As a call to action, it’s very wimpy. Lacking something more creative, “Please call me to...” will be more effective.

“If you have questions...”
Often used with the line above, this one adds to the wimpy-ness. It’s more effective to assume people will have questions. Try “Call me with your questions.” or "I'm happy to answer your questions." Or pick a different reason for them to call you.

The short version? Stop beating around the bush. Make your content concise and to the point. These wimpy lines lack confidence!

Thanks to Kate MacLeod and Lily Herman for the inspiration!

07 June 2015

Alert: How to Increase your Open Rate by 38.1%


I admit to having a bit of fun with that subject line but I'm not BSing you. Here is the statistic given by Adestra:

Using the word 'alert' in a subject line increases open rates by 38.1% (variance vs. average).
source: adestra.com/resources/infographics/4-steps-writing-killer-subject-line/

You have just participated in an experiment if you opened this post in your email - thanks!

If you can legitimately use 'alert' in your subject line, that's great. But beware - if your subject line is not relevant to the content within, you might get more opens but will lose credibility (and subscribers).

Another way to lose credibility is to quote incorrect information as fact. I originally stumbled across that statistic in an article by Hubspot: 19 Subject Line Stats Impacting Our Open Rates. This jumped off the page:

61.8% increase in opens when using the word 'alert' in subject lines. (Source:Adestra)

It seemed a little too good to be true and I immediately started plotting to use 'alert' in a subject line. I'm glad I decided to check the original source where I discovered that 61.8% applies to click rates, not open rates as quoted.

Be alert to opportunities to increase readership but use marketing advice strategically, not frivolously.

photo by Art&Music*Woo-Hoo / Flickr

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01 June 2015

Why a lot of eMail Marketing Advice is Wrong


You might be thinking I'm off my rocker using that subject line, since I regularly dish out email marketing advice. The thing to remember is that almost all the advice you'll read is situational.

One expert will say that subject lines like "Wow" or "Hey" work best, while another will tell us to avoid them at all costs.

Because I have experience with informational marketing for small businesses in particular, I evaluate all of the advice I read in that context. Sometimes I get great ideas that I can use with one or more clients, but rarely do I read anything new that would apply to all of them. That's because a really successful email campaign needs to be specific in its strategy.

Here are some of the things that will affect your strategy:
Understanding these important distinctions and then creating a strategy that takes them into account is not as simple as reading some general advice online. There is no universal set of golden rules for email marketing and that's good because following rules gets boring.

It takes experience to know what works when, or to predict the results of certain tactics. Like all things in life, listen to advice but realize that its application is limited and how those limitations might affect you.

photo by QnD2011 / Flickr

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27 May 2015

Just Because You can Google It...


Just because you can Google something doesn’t make you an expert. (I just love those Realtor ads!) That line is so true of anything that involves skill and talent.

Recently I learned how true it is of audio recording and voice overs when I had the pleasure of a coaching session with voice actor Natasha Marchewka. I didn't think it would be too hard to make my little recording, but I was a bit nervous when I arrived at Natasha's place.

We started by making a recording to use as a baseline. Then Natasha coached me about how to improve my delivery - posture, breathing, intonation and so on. Finally I did 3 more recordings. Those last recordings were so much more difficult than the first one. I was hyper aware of all the things I needed to be doing as I spoke, sounding ‘natural’ being one of them.

Here are a few things I learned:
  • Talking in person is way easier than talking into a microphone, at least for me. It’s hard to use my hands and get expressive when my mouth is against a microphone and paper in my hand.
  • Appropriate word emphasis is critical.
  • My natural cadence is repetitive and boring. Changing up my cadence is tough; I’m a creature of habit.
  • Breathing into my stomach is harder than it sounds.
  • It’s so important to edit my script to insert pauses, to indicate where to slow down or speed up, to group words together, to emphasize certain words, to go high or low with tone, and more.
Not only do I have an audio recording for my About page, but I can continue to practice and apply the skills I learned from Natasha whenever I’m speaking, not just into a microphone. (Read Natasha's side of the story here along with my recordings.)

A reminder for all of us: Things that seem simple are that way because of all the expertise that went into making them that way.

originally published in Work Better, Not Harder May 27, 2015
photo by loudestnoise / Flickr

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Adding Audio to Your Content - Part 3

*** Click to listen in rather than read

Are you confident about your voice? Even an experienced and articulate business person can use help with their presentation skills and could be speaking and communicating in a way that may be hindering their professional image.

As a follow-up to my “Adding Audio to Your Content” blogs, Part 1 and Part 2, I had the privilege of offering Presentation Skills Coaching to Linda Daley of Daley Progress. We took our blog theme of producing audio content one step further to help Linda add audio to her own webpage.

What needed to happen before recording her audio was coaching on the presentation of the script she had provided. To Linda’s credit, she easefully recorded the first take of her script as a starting point. You can hear in her opening attempt, that she is reading from a page and that she doesn’t sound as passionate about her script as she probably feels. Listen to the take without any voice coaching.

During the initial recording, I created notes based on where I thought Linda could use some work to elevate her presentation. We addressed her breathing style and posture, as well as, phrasing, tempo, and intonation, word emphasis, and her overall intention.

Through the coaching process, Linda learned that she needed to take a couple of deep breaths before speaking and even felt a shake - that is, physically shaking off nervousness - was helpful in preparing her to deliver her script. Further, being clear about whom she was speaking to and what she was really intending to communicate helped her focus on delivering the words naturally and with dynamics.

Working through her script together, highlighting words and phrases, and indicating pauses and timing, we took the script to the next level. Though Linda felt she could use a few more coaching sessions, she became aware of where she had already improved and how this learning opportunity would benefit her overall communicating style for the telephone, workshops, and public speeches.

Listen to the recording of Linda after a 1-½ hour coaching session.

This piece of audio is now something she can use on her website to further engage potential clients, as well as, a marketing element that she can share on social media. Coaching a professional like Linda is greatly rewarding as it demonstrates how someone, already skilled in their own right, can quickly improve their vocal abilities to express themselves proficiently in keeping with their professional image, sounding like themselves, but better.

originally published in Work Better, Not Harder May 27, 2015

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19 May 2015

Dear Subscriber

The reason for adding a subscriber's name as a form field to your messages is to make a closer connection with them. So what happens when you get something like "Dear {Subscriber}"? The exact opposite, right?

Unless you're prepared to spend time maintaining your mailing list, I usually recommend not to use form fields to insert subscribers' names into emails.

First you have to get the name. Asking for a subscriber's name on your sign-up form is possible, but also not a good practice because the more info you ask for at sign-up, the less likely people will be to sign up.

You could, instead, use another tactic to get the name of your subscriber. This is an example that came at the top of an email from Swiss Chalet:


The only thing wrong with this is it arrived 5 days after Mother's Day.

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15 May 2015

5 Inspired Ways to Develop Content Ideas

Inspiring quotes about getting inspired – no better place to start when stumped. You can simply read this article, but I'd like you to grab a pen now and start a running list of content ideas for your blog or newsletter. Each of these suggestions can be accomplished in just minutes!

“I think I'm a born storyteller. Inspiration is all around me. I can read a newspaper article and come up with an idea for a book.”  - Jackie Collins
#1. Grab a newspaper, or find one online, and start reading. Scan the headlines for inspiration – a topic, concept or how-to that you can adapt to suit your target market.

"Adults are always asking little kids what they want to be when they grow up because they're looking for ideas."  - Paula Poundstone
#2. Look at what you do from the perspective of today's children. What is the future - of your industry, products/services, target market - that they can look forward to in 10 years, or 20 years? Use your imagination and have fun!

“Most creative work is a process of people passing ideas and inspirations from the past into the future and adding their own creativity along the way.”  - Joichi Ito
#3. What is the history of what you do? Has it been around a long time or is it new? How has it evolved? Do a little research online now. Or pick up the phone and interview someone who’s been doing it longer than you.

"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange these apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas."  - George Bernard Shaw
#4. Exchange ideas with a friend. Take a moment now to think of an idea for a colleague. Sometimes it's easier to come up with content ideas for other businesses. Phone your friend, share your idea, and ask for an idea in exchange. Email works, too. You'll be surprised at how easy it is to inspire each other.

“The popularity of the Internet and using it as an available resource has really changed the way chefs kind of gather information and look for inspiration. To me, a food trend is potentially a lot of people following an idea.”  - Grant Achatz
#5. What’s trending in your industry? Or what’s trending that affects your target market? Check "What’s Trending" on Google, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram.


You'll find that sitting down to write is not as stressful when you already have a list of ideas to start with.

11 May 2015

Adding LinkedIn Contacts to your Subscriber List


Are you still confused about what ‘consent’ means under the Canadian Anti Spam Legislation (CASL)? There are mixed messages as to whether it’s OK to add your LinkedIn contacts to your mailing list. And there’s a reason for that – it’s only OK in certain circumstances.

First, if you sell only to consumers, stop now. You need express consent, so the rest of this article doesn’t apply to you.

Implied consent is relevant for businesses that sell to other businesses. There are three key requirements for implied consent:
  1. The contact’s email address has been 'published conspicuously' and has no disclaimer that they do not accept commercial electronic messages.
  2. The message you are sending is relevant to their job at the company they work for. (Example: You can email a university professor to sell her textbooks, but not clothes.)
  3. There is an unsubscribe mechanism, so the recipient can signal lack of interest or relevancy.
Even if you are compliant with these requirements, you will want to carefully review your LinkedIn contact list and remove contacts for whom your information isn't relevant.

How to add LinkedIn contacts to your subscriber list:
  1. Export your LinkedIn contacts into a .csv file. Search LinkedIn Help for “export contacts” and you'll find clear instructions.
  2. Open your .csv file in Excel.
  3. Carefully review the list and delete contacts for whom your information will be irrelevant.
  4. Save the list and upload it to your bulk email application. (If you are my client, send your list to me instead.)
Note! Contacts often use different email addresses on LinkedIn than their primary business email. Be alert so you don’t add current subscribers under new email addresses.

This might not be a popular recommendation for some people. I get that. But we now have a legal definition of spam in Canada and it may be different than your personal opinions. I encourage you to make your email marketing decisions as a business owner, not as a consumer.


06 May 2015

How to Start Writing when you Feel Stuck


Are you struggling when you sit down to write? Do those first couple of sentences elude you? Recently I learned a powerful technique for dealing with this dilemma.

During a coaching session on writing with Neil Everton, I was asking him for help with closing my articles. Neil directed me back to the top of the examples I had brought and suggested we start at the beginning.

You want your reader to nod and think “yes”, Neil told me. That first sentence needs to connect with the reader and bring them along for the rest of the article. One way to do this is to ask a question, as I did at the start of this article. Whether it’s a question or a statement, try to elicit feelings about the topic and empathize with the reader’s situation.

Did I also figure out my endings? I learned that getting the beginning right made writing the closing so much easier. I simply need to answer that opening question.

When you're stumped at the start, write out the question or problem that you will answer. Even if you eventually edit it, you’ll be over the hump and onto the rest of your article.

photo by becca.peterson26 / Flickr 
originally published in Work Better, Not Harder May 6, 2015

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How to Pay an Invoice through PayPal WITHOUT Using a PayPal Account

This isn't really a social media tutorial, but I do get asked frequently how to pay my online invoices from FreshBooks if one doesn't have a PayPal account, or if one prefers to not go through PayPal. It’s really pretty simple and I used a recent invoice to make this quick video tutorial for you.

You don't need a PayPal account to pay an invoice via the PayPal system. (Click to Tweet This)


So, now you don’t have to put invoices through your PayPal account if you don't want to. And you don't have to ask if the person will accept another method of payment, or wait until the event occurs to pay. It’s simple and quick to pay online through PayPal, even if you don't want to log in to your account (or if you don’t have one). This also means, there’s really no reason why small business owners should be afraid to have PayPal buttons on their website... because anyone can pay with a credit card, without having an account. And now you have a video to send them to!

originally published twirp.ca/2015/04/how-to-pay-an-online-invoice-through-paypal-without-using-a-paypal-account/

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01 May 2015

Blogging Tip: Link to your Best Content


Want to get people to read more than one post when they get to your blog? There's one tactic that's worked great for me and it's really pretty simple.

After you write your article and before you publish it, review it looking for opportunities to add links to past posts. You will see at least one example in this article once I've finished it.

Ideally, you'll have several go-to articles for important topics in your industry. You may even want to save these links in a Word doc or Evernote, or use them as a resource page on your website. Once you have written a few hundred posts, it'll be harder to keep track of in the back of your mind. These go-to articles should themselves have more links to other posts. And so you encourage deeper reading.

This really doesn't take very long and you will see the impact on your statistics very quickly.

Aside from starting to use this tactic now, you can benefit by:
  1. making a list of your go-to posts for easy reference
  2. reviewing and adding links to published posts, especially those go-to posts

photo by Ed Yourdon / Flickr

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27 April 2015

Content Creation (Wrap-Up #4)

This is our fourth installment of content creation wrap-up posts - a library of links to all of our articles about creating interesting and useful content from January 2014 through April 2015.

Planning is an important process because it forces you to think, to research, to consider, to brainstorm - to be creative. Our Yearly Content Planning Worksheet will help get you organized.

I'm a big fan of repurposing content and infographics will appeal to a different audience than text. Read Repurpose Articles into Infographics to get tips on how to do this.

Your content strategy wouldn't be complete without having a look at what others are doing. Read Research to Develop your Content Strategy for activities you can engage in regularly, perhaps quarterly, to keep current.

We all get stuck for ideas now and then. I've found some tools to help me get past that. You can get links to them in Idea Challenged? Here's 3 Tools.

When looking for images to go with my articles, usually I want a look that is less staged than a purchased stock photo. As an alternative I go Searching for Creative Commons Images.

Craft your message so that negative emotions, like guilt and helplessness, are overcome by positive, empathetic ones. Read Does your Content make your Readers feel Guilty? for some tips on how to do this.

If one of your newsletter goals is to make a personal connection with your readers, A Personal Introductory Message from you is a nice touch. This message should contain your personality, but it shouldn't be all about you.

Even if you don't like writing, a newsletter is still possible. Find out How to Publish a Newsletter without Writing and get some great suggestions.

In Newsletter Ideas for Real Estate Professionals find lots of ideas to incorporate into your newsletter strategy if your goal is to provide useful and interesting info which will make you a trusted resource.

The next time you're feeling that what-am-I-going-to-write-about stress, check out this list of Reusable Content Ideas to get you Unstuck. All of these triggers can give you topics to write about immediately.

Aside from possibly saving you time, there's a strategic reason to recycle your ideas, too. Not everyone has read everything you've written. Read How to Recycle your Ideas for ways to expand on your past content.

In Newsletter Ideas for Business Networking Associations you'll find relevant, useful and interesting ideas to engage your members and potential members.

There are ways to create content on a regular basis without writing articles. One of those is researching and compiling information that’s valuable to your target market. Can't Write? Try Research.

When you want your potential customer to feel more of a personal connection with you, offering more of yourself via an audio greeting is another step closer to making your way into their hearts and minds. In Adding Audio to your Content, Part 1 and Part 2, voice actor Natasha Marchewka explains how even novices can create audio content.

Whether it's an article title, a blog post title, a subject line or a call to action, there is no doubt that crafting a good one takes a little art and a little science. Crafting a Title to Get Read means using keywords and phrases that people might search for.

Looking for past content creation wrap-ups? Wrap-up #1 - Wrap-up #2 - Wrap-up #3

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